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Friday's downpour caused flooding in areas of Berwick.

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The drone photo shows flooding Friday in Country Estates Subdivision in Berwick.

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David Tisdale is one of the Country Club Estates residents who told the Berwick Town Council about flooding after Friday's rainfall.

The Daily Review/Bill Decker

Water hazard: Country Club Estates residents tell Berwick Council about flooding

BERWICK — Some Country Club Estates residents are seeing water in homes that have never flooded before.
And on Tuesday, they asked the Berwick Town Council for help.
Mayor Duval Arthur promised to have the city’s engineer look at the problems that emerged again Friday and talk with residents about potential solutions.
The first step will be trying to determine exactly what the problem is. At Tuesday’s meeting, which drew more than 30 people for an otherwise light agenda, suspicion fell on drainage system pipes that are too small, clogged ditches and landscaping changes at the St. Mary Golf & Country Club course.
Arthur said the town received reports of water in 39 homes.
The affected area of the subdivision is between the golf course to the north and La. 182 to the south, between Patti Drive and Tournament Boulevard.
The National Weather Service said 4.17 inches of rain fell Friday at Harry P. Williams Memorial Airport in six hours leading up to midday. More than 2 inches fell in an hour just before lunchtime.
The Berwick residents and officials talked about more rain than that: 6 inches in two hours.
“I know how much rain we got,” resident Becky Williams said at the meeting. “But the whole town of Berwick didn’t flood.”
For some of the residents, it was the second time water came into their homes in two months.
Sandra Watson, a Hogan Street resident for 45 years, didn’t get water in her home. But she brought cellphone video showing sheets of water running over her property.
“I had rapids in my front yard,” Watson said at the meeting. “If I had a boogie board, I could have ridden the rapids.”
Teacher Christy Pitre, a Hogan Street resident, submitted a written statement in which she said her home has flooded twice since April.
“I’m constantly concerned every time it rains, even the smallest of showers,” Pitre wrote.
Kevin and Tanisha Lewis, who live on Hebert Street, wondered whether it is wise to make complete repairs when another hard rain might bring more flooding.
John Tholen has lived on Palmer Street for 50 years and said after the meeting that the problem is getting worse.
David Tisdale of Jones Street sees another problem: “Nobody knows how the drainage system is supposed to work.”
“The fact is it’s flooding and flooding a lot,” said Stan Beaubouef, who lives on Snead Street. He thinks water flowing off the golf course “may be the answer.”
Arthur said the flood-prone part of the subdivision is the oldest portion, much of it built in the early 1970s when the area was still in the unincorporated parish. The drainage system there includes 12-inch pipes.
“Is that adequate?” Arthur said. “I don’t think it is.”

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